Why do men feel threatened by women?” I asked a male friend of mine. (I love that wonderful rhetorical device, “a male friend of mine.” It’s often used by female journalists when they want to say something particularly bitchy but don’t want to be held responsible for it themselves. It also lets people know that you do have male friends, that you aren’t one of those fire-breathing mythical monsters, The Radical Feminists, who walk around with little pairs of scissors and kick men in the shins if they open doors for you. “A male friend of mine” also gives—let us admit it—a certain weight to the opinions expressed.) So this male friend of mine, who does by the way exist, conveniently entered into the following dialogue. “I mean,” I said, “men are bigger, most of the time, they can run faster, strangle better, and they have on the average a lot more money and power.” “They’re afraid women will laugh at them,” he said. “Undercut their world view.” Then I asked some women students in a quickie poetry seminar I was giving, “Why do women feel threatened by men?” “They’re afraid of being killed,” they said.

Margaret Atwood, Second Words: Selected Critical Prose (1983), pg. 413.
(via bydbach)

You’ve probably heard the punchline before, but here’s the full context for the quote. (via muffinw)

(via onlymystories)

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"With regard to stereotyping, Uma Narayan (1997) describes how in the U.S., when women in India or Pakistan die “by fire” in dowry deaths (a man or his family kills the woman because they are dissatisfied with her dowry to the paternal family line with whom she often lives), many people in the United States call this barbaric, horrendous, and due to the “backwardness” of the South Asian culture. However, when women in the U.S. are killed by guns (at the same rate as dowry deaths in India), this is rarely, if ever, said to be due to the culture; rather it is usually blamed on the individual man’s unstable personality at best and patriarchy at worst. But the American culture is not said to be “backward” or to blame for her death."

"With regard to a culture’s protective factors, for example, Kantor et al. (1994) has found that Mexican men born in Mexico but living in the U.S. are less likely to be violent against their wives than U.S.- born Mexican American men; and the longer the men are in the U.S., the more violent they are toward their wives. Thus, contrary to the myth that Latino/a culture is more patriarchal—and thus, supposedly more dangerous, for its women—the intact nature of the Mexican experience, not diluted as much by U.S. influence, seems to act as a protective factor against battering."

"One of the major issues for battered women from marginalized communities is that outside help is feared because there is so much individual and institutional discrimination against her from “outsiders”—police, courts, doctors, domestic violence agencies, etc.—in mainstream communities. So while it may be true that she will face violence in her family or community, it is just as true that if she goes outside her community, she will face another set of hostilities. "

"The discrimination in the criminal justice system in the U.S. is deep and profound: as many as one-third of all young African American men are in prison, jail, on probation or parole in the U.S. (Sokoloff, 2003). In some cities, like Baltimore and Washington D.C. , it is over half! Black women who are battered often do not feel the police and the criminal justice system will solve their problems; rather they may just intensify them. In short, the advice to either “leave” the situation or to “call the police” may actually harm rather than help certain groups of battered women."

Domestic Violence at the Crossroads: Violence Against Poor Women and Women of Color by Natalie J. Sokoloff (via arari)

pdf [x]

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(via deep-sea-siren)

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Because we don’t speak about sex, there is no socially acceptable language surrounding it. So the language of porn has jumped in to fill that space, and that’s an issue, because in a male-dominated industry the language of porn is all too often male-generated. The person who coined the term “finger blasting” didn’t have a vagina. The person who coined the term, “getting your ass railed” never got their ass railed. Pounding, hammering, banging… And language matters, because when the only language you have available is abusive and one-directional, in terms of having things done to you, it creates a very weird view of how sex works.

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Some of the other things that are very common in porn is the very stereotypical scenario where a woman says “No” but then she’s somehow forced to do the sex act anyway and at some point she discovers that she really loves it and that’s what she’s dreamed of doing her whole life and that’s extremely common in pornography.

And when you have guys masturbating to something like that, learning about sex from something like that what that’s actually teaching them is that A) Women’s boundaries don’t matter, B) Anything you do to a woman she’s always going to love it…They are watching this stuff, they are masturbating to it, they’re getting these messages and they’re internalizing these messages not just on an intellectual level in terms of ideas but also now physically in their bodies; what they feel.

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foxinu:

nsfwjynx:

the-pink-mist:

There was a split second there where his like, “wait, what? bro what are you doing?” 
On more serious note, PTSD dogs for veterans are so fucking therapeutic. They’re like the one person you can spill your guts to and never worry about ever being judged or have that secret divulged. There are times when I definitely prefer the company of a dog over a human. 

Therapy animals save lives.

These dogs are even still so much more amazing. They check rooms before their handler enters, so they can clear it to help the person feel safe. Like in the gif, they are there when panic attacks or nightmares occur, to be something for the person to help ground themselves on, or yes just to turn on the lights. Even more amazing, many people are able to reduce their medication when they have a PTSD service dog there to help them. These dogs are useful for not just veterans, but also victims of abuse, accident trauma, natural disasters, and others. Their training allows them to be useful in situations where medical assistance is needed, as well. Some PTSD dogs are trained to recognize repetitive behaviours in handlers, and signal the handler to break the repetition and stopping the behaviour and possibly injury. 
Service dogs in general are just awesome. Remember to respect any that you see out in public. They are not there for you to walk up to and play with, even the puppies!

foxinu:

nsfwjynx:

the-pink-mist:

There was a split second there where his like, “wait, what? bro what are you doing?” 

On more serious note, PTSD dogs for veterans are so fucking therapeutic. They’re like the one person you can spill your guts to and never worry about ever being judged or have that secret divulged. There are times when I definitely prefer the company of a dog over a human. 

Therapy animals save lives.

These dogs are even still so much more amazing. They check rooms before their handler enters, so they can clear it to help the person feel safe. Like in the gif, they are there when panic attacks or nightmares occur, to be something for the person to help ground themselves on, or yes just to turn on the lights. Even more amazing, many people are able to reduce their medication when they have a PTSD service dog there to help them. These dogs are useful for not just veterans, but also victims of abuse, accident trauma, natural disasters, and others. Their training allows them to be useful in situations where medical assistance is needed, as well. Some PTSD dogs are trained to recognize repetitive behaviours in handlers, and signal the handler to break the repetition and stopping the behaviour and possibly injury. 

Service dogs in general are just awesome. Remember to respect any that you see out in public. They are not there for you to walk up to and play with, even the puppies!

(via guy)

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imran-suleiman:

Photographer Mattias Klum from National Geographic gets close and personal with a lion.

(via swingsetindecember)

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thatisuncleferdinand:

April Book Photo Challenge: Day 15. Quote

So pleasantly surprised with this book.  Such fun to read!

(via thelastbookicorn)

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Inspired by x 

Original poem x

(Source: allisonargenc, via notenoughgatorade)

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